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Forget North Korea: World War II Was Guam's Bloodiest Battle

Should North Korea launch ballistic missiles at Guam, it would be the first missile strike on U.S. territory. But for Guam, it will be just another chapter in that island's bloody history.

In the fifteenth century, Spain claimed Guam. In 1898, the United States took it from Spain during the Spanish-American War.

And in World War II, Guam would be fought over by Japan and the United States.

Why Russia and China Still Fear the F-16 Fighting Falcon

The F-16 Fighting Falcon bears an unusual distinctions: it is one of the only top jet fighters in the world to also be cost efficient. Fast and extremely agile, the light fighter does have some shortcomings in range and payload compared to larger twin-engine fighters like the F-15 Eagle, but that was easy to forgive due to costing less than half as much—around $18 million in 1999 ($27 million in 2017 dollars).

Here's How the U.S. Marine Corps Will Train Future Snipers

First-person shooter is one of the most popular perspectives among gamers, but these simulations can be used for much more than entertainment — specifically military training. And thanks to new the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer III, Marine Corps marksmen are about to take their sharpshooting skills to a whole new level.

Though the Corps has been using virtual reality to train Marines for two decades, the systems for marksmanship have become exponentially better.

Netanyahu's Priorities and U.S. Responses

Recently I wrote about the two-sided Saudi policy on Iran, in which Riyadh sees good reason to take quiet steps to reduce tension with its neighbor across the Persian Gulf while still making alarm about a supposed Iranian threat the basis for keeping the United States tied to its side.  But Saudi Arabia (along with its partners in the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain) is not the only party in the region to exploit an anti-Iran theme as a basis for retaining U.S.

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