Andrew J. Bacevich

Essays

In the opening round of an exchange on democracy promotion that will continue over the coming weeks, five TNI authors examine themes and questions raised in Paul Saunders's essay.

America's post-9/11 tryst with the authoritarian regimes of Central Asia should not be transformed into a longer-term "marriage of convenience." It would end badly.

Despite the rhetoric, the new administration's foreign policy bespeaks not change, but continuity with the Clinton era.

Military force has become the hallmark of U.S. foreign policy, ironically in the name of enforcing a global utopia.

Military force has become the hallmark of U.S. foreign policy, ironically in the name of enforcing a global utopia.

Reviews

America has at times oriented itself to the East, at others to the West. But what we have always had is a sense of our manifest destiny. And now the ideals of California—nihilism with a suntan—seem to be our primary ideological export.

Instead of turning back Islamism, military interventions lead large swaths of local populations to pick up arms in defense of their homelands

Geoffrey Roberts treads through morally hazardous territory portraying Stalin as a great statesman.

Managing the Pentagon and managing wars are two different things, a lesson Robert McNamara learned the hard way.

Pedestrian books can sometimes serve salutary purposes.

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April 21, 2014