The Skeptics

Germany's Tea Party Troubles

Arriving only in Berlin a few days after yet another political shock to the German body politic, I was struck by several things during my brief visit. The weather was beautiful, as was the city, which I last visited nine years ago. I missed the BMW Marathon by a day, but managed to partake of the festive atmosphere in and around the Brandenburg Gate.

Three Questions Facing the Mosul Operation

Two years ago, the Islamic State was on the warpath. The jihadist group, treated as a backburner issue at that time by the Obama administration and more of a nuisance than a national security threat to the U.S. homeland, shocked the world with its blitzkrieg across northern and central Iraq.  An Iraqi army that was trained by the U.S. military and funded by the U.S. taxpayer to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars fled south in terror.

What If Muslim Immigrants Don't Want to Be "Like Us"?

When they discuss immigration policy, especially when it applies to the influx of hundreds of thousands of Muslims to the West, pundits don’t necessarily exhibit a liberal bias, or for that matter, a left-leaning view of the world. How would John Locke, Adam Smith or Karl Marx respond to the current debate? My guess is as good as yours.

The Real Terrorism Problem: There is No Such Thing as Perfect Security

In a span of a few hours, the United States experienced a series of lone-wolf terrorist attacks from individuals who law enforcement authorities believe don’t have direct operational connections with international terrorist organizations. On the streets of New York, the pressure cooker explosion in the densely packed Chelsea neighborhood on a Saturday night was taken in stride; New Yorkers, after all, have witnessed acts of terrorism before, and the NYPD is on constant alert knowing full well that the city is always a top operational target for terrorists.

The Collapse of the UN Security Council

Although the 2016 U.N. meetings seem quite similar compared to others held over the last several years, this week’s debate comes at a time when the international community is inundated with problems in virtually every region of the world.  With the exception of a landmark peace agreement that ended five decades of conflict in Colombia, every region is experiencing some degree of threat that could spiral to a whole new level if the international community as a whole and regional governments in particular are unable to find a way to address them.

Why NATO Isn't a Threat to Russia

Russia’s apologists blame the United States for the recent deterioration of U.S.-Russia relations by arguing that if Washington had shown greater respect for Russia’s interests after the Cold War, Moscow would not have felt the need to safeguard its security by dismembering Ukraine and Georgia.

Expect the Same Old Congressional Maneuvers on Sequestration

If there is one thing Sen. John McCain and many of his colleagues cannot stand, it is the automatic, arbitrary budget caps under the Budget Control Act that have forced the U.S. government to cut discretionary spending across the board. A law passed in 2011 that was originally meant to address America’s massive national debt problem and scare lawmakers into compromising on further deficit reduction measures quickly transformed into what former House Speaker John Boehner called a “meat axe” to the federal government.