July-Aug 2012

Israel's New Politics and the Fate of Palestine

Geography and demography now trump democracy in Israel. The country pays lip service to the two-state solution while steadily appropriating the land it wants in the occupied territories.

Essays

The Divided Map of Europe

The Continent’s many identities and fault lines stretch back into the nether centuries of European history. All have been influenced by the immutable force of geography, which also will shape Europe’...

The Salafi Awakening

In the wake of Egypt’s revolution and subsequent elections, Westerners have focused on the Muslim Brotherhood. But the Egyptian Salafis, more fundamentalist than the Brotherhood, bear watching as...

The Fading Arab Oil Empire

Major developments in the oil sector are decisively undermining the once-defining role of the Middle East in the global energy market. The region’s potency in global affairs is on the wane, making Obama’s pivot to East Asia well-timed.

The Perpetual Border Battle

Though some pundits insist illegal immigration is fading as a national problem, careful study of the border situation suggests otherwise. The challenge remains serious, and large enforcement gaps persist.

JFK's Overshadowed Crisis

In October 1962, Kennedy confronted both the Cuban missile crisis and a war between China and India. Though Cuba got more attention then and now, that Asian crisis still holds valuable diplomatic lessons.

The Folly of Nation Building

War is costly. Nation building is costlier. And nation-building projects almost never succeed, as this analysis demonstrates.

Books & Reviews

The Critique of Pure Kagan

Robert Kagan has issued a cri de coeur urging Americans to reject calls for reduced U.S. military spending, curtailments in the country’s global commitments and restraint on its interventionist impulses. But his prescriptions are shortsighted.

The Great White House Rating Game

Robert Merry’s new book explores the academic impulse to assess the presidents—but with a twist. He melds contemporaneous judgments of the electorate with academic polls to yield an engaging history.

The Man They Called Ibn Saud

Michael Darlow and Barbara Bray’s biography probes the life of Abdul Aziz Ibn Saud, a giant of a man with a powerful force of personality, forged the often-warring tribes of the Arabian Peninsula into the country of Saudi Arabia.

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April 17, 2014