Nov-Dec 2012

The Realist

American Interest, American Blood

The price America pays in blood for its overseas initiatives rarely gets mentioned in political debates surrounding such policies, but it deserves more attention.

Robert W. Merry

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Articles

A Modest Post-Assad Plan

Should Assad fall, the ensuing chaos and difficulty will be immense, and calls will rise for U.S. humanitarian intervention. Ambitious initiatives likely will fail, but compelling arguments can be made for going in small.

Daniel BymanRenanah Miles

Reading Machiavelli in Iraq

Machiavelli’s political analyses on civic life in Italy’s fifteenth-century city-states offer a good starting point for those interested in determining the best way forward for today’s Iraq.

Kenneth M. Pollack

Evangelists of Democracy

Radicals of the democracy-promotion movement embody the very thing they are fighting against—a closed-minded conviction that they represent the one true path for all societies and thus possess a monopoly on social, ethical and political truth.

David Rieff

All Roads Lead to Berlin

Germany is no longer Europe’s most troublesome player. It’s now an indispensable nation. The power of this transformation is personified by Chancellor Angela Merkel and her delicate political and diplomatic balancing act.

Jacob Heilbrunn

Asia's New Age of Instability

Asia’s four pillars of stability, bulwarks of a highly successful regional system crafted and fostered by America, are all crumbling. The region’s future will be shaped and defined by the struggle to replace those pillars.

Michael Wesley

Reviews and Essays

Gambling with the Fate of the World

Why has there been no World War III? A new tome probes the Cold War policy most relevant to this puzzle—Eisenhower’s doctrine of “massive retaliation” threatening a nuclear response against conventional threats.

The Peculiar Life of Joseph Kennedy

From his mercurial personality to his delusions of aptitude in the political realm to his catastrophic diplomatic appointment, a new book provides a thorough account of Kennedy’s life and all of its many highs and lows.

A Modest Post-Assad Plan

Should Assad fall, the ensuing chaos and difficulty will be immense, and calls will rise for U.S. humanitarian intervention. Ambitious initiatives likely will fail, but compelling arguments can be made for going in small.

Daniel BymanRenanah Miles

China's Inadvertent Empire

Beijing has quietly strengthened its position economically and diplomatically in Central Asia, perhaps the most pivotal geographic zone on the planet. This development has powerful implications for America and the world.

Raffaello PantucciAlexandros Petersen

Reading Machiavelli in Iraq

Machiavelli’s political analyses on civic life in Italy’s fifteenth-century city-states offer a good starting point for those interested in determining the best way forward for today’s Iraq.

Kenneth M. Pollack

Evangelists of Democracy

Radicals of the democracy-promotion movement embody the very thing they are fighting against—a closed-minded conviction that they represent the one true path for all societies and thus possess a monopoly on social, ethical and political truth.

David Rieff

All Roads Lead to Berlin

Germany is no longer Europe’s most troublesome player. It’s now an indispensable nation. The power of this transformation is personified by Chancellor Angela Merkel and her delicate political and diplomatic balancing act.

Jacob Heilbrunn

Asia's New Age of Instability

Asia’s four pillars of stability, bulwarks of a highly successful regional system crafted and fostered by America, are all crumbling. The region’s future will be shaped and defined by the struggle to replace those pillars.

Michael Wesley